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Reports in Reunion

Part 1: Report Options

by Jan McClintock

Updated 2/15/00 by Leister Productions.

After you spend the time finding, analyzing, and entering your family data into Reunion, it's nice to know you can publish that data in lots of different ways. You can create many reports in order to share your findings, to publish your family history, to bring on research trips, or to have a backup of your data.

Before you begin creating reports, you can tell Reunion how you want to present them. Using the Options -> Reports menu, you are setting up the basis for future report formats, as well as telling Reunion where to put files and which other software to use.

Report Options window

These options are explained in the electronic manual. [Help -> Contents -> Reports] Here are a few examples and tips for getting started.


Formatting

Endnotes

Endnotes are an applicable list, placed at the end of the report, of the sources you used to find the given data. When you choose to show or list sources in a report, only the sources which are linked to the specific data in that report are given.

Endnotes

In the Report Options window when Endnotes is selected, the choices are to include the applicable endnotes (list them at the end of the report), and to enable 'ibids' (put Ibid. in place of an endnote that is the same as the one above it).

The second section allows you to print a batch of reports and include the endnotes on each report or all together at the end of the batch. In other words, you mark 20 people and create person sheets for all; you can either include the applicable Endnotes at the end of each of the 20 reports, or include the Endnotes all together at the end of the whole batch.

Index

When you create a report, you have the option of creating an Index of all the people in that report. This list is sorted alphabetically by last name. Using the Report Options, you can also show the birth and death years for all people listed.

For example, in the Index of a Register Report:

GREEN

John Wiley (1843 - 1904) child of 5
Mary Elizabeth (1954 - ) spouse of 18
Susan Anne (1904 - 1968) child of 7
William Hobart (1856 - 1924) child of 5

HANSON

John Richard Jr. (1930 - ) child of 12
Josephine Alder (1823 - ?) spouse of 2

The People per Web Page option allows you to limit the number of people that appear in an index at the end of a report on a web page. Say you create a Register Report for your web site, and the report includes 290 people. Since the Register Report Index includes the Last Name on one line and then all the first names following (like above), that web page would be very long. If you limited each page of the Index to 50 people, however, viewers could scan the pages much more quickly.

Return Address

The Return Address lets you add contact information at the end of your reports. This is important when sharing reports with family members and other researchers. If they find an error or want to give you more information, your name and address are right there. Click the Include checkbox in the Report Options window to add a Return Address (or any other text).

Please send additions or corrections to:
Janice Fitzgerald McClintock
P.O. Box 30
Rio Medina, TX 78066-0030
mcfitz@texas.net

Signature

The Signature option can serve as a credit line or can be a way to personalize reports. Signature lines appear on preformatted, graphic reports like Person Sheets, Blank Forms, and Cascading Pedigrees.

Created 3 Mar 1998 by J.F. McClintock

Created 3 Mar 1998 by Reunion for Macintosh

Created 3 Mar 1998 for Aunt Louise and Uncle Bert

Sensitive Data

Reunion provides us with a way to enter sensitive data in a Notes or Memo field and at the same time exclude it from reports by surrounding it with any of the four delimiter characters:

(sensitive data)
<sensitive data>
[sensitive data]
{sensitive data}

What is sensitive data? In family relationships, sensitive data might be defined as any information of a delicate nature that should be used with discretion. [Personally, if I think information would hurt someone in any way, I keep it to myself.] Since this is "relative," here are a few examples:

  • A child is unaware that he is adopted, and the parents have no intention of telling him yet
  • A child was born out of wedlock or a couple became pregnant before their marriage
  • A failed first marriage that a spouse prefers to forget (or about which other family members don't know)
  • Medical information (hereditary medical conditions are exceptions)

Remember that just because something is a fact doesn't mean it must be disseminated. We must each decide what information we include in our files and in reports and web pages.

You might also use the Sensitive Data feature to enter research notes, like reminders to check a particular source or validate a date, or notes on the reliability of certain data. This is a good way to keep "for my eyes only" data handy for reference but not included in reports. Use the checkbox in Report Options to turn this feature on and off.

Sensitive Data Delimiters

Source Citations

Here is where you tell Reunion how you want your source citations and source details to appear in reports.

Source Citations

Example 1 shows Superscript citations, and detail is ignored (doesn't appear at all):

William and Martha were married on 19 Jun 178912 in Nicholson, Wyoming Co, PA4. They lived with his parents, John QUICK and Elizabeth WOOD78, at least between 1789 and 179247. William and Martha lived in Bradford County, PA in Nov 17929.

4. Arthur Craig Quick, "A Genealogy of the Quick Family in America, 1625 1942," (South Haven and Palisades Park, Michigan: Arthur C. Quick, 1942), as seen on Microfiche No.G1704 at the State Library of Pennsylvania, 1994, and photocopies from the original book

9. "Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files", 3 vols., abst. by Virgil D. White (Waynesboro, TN: The National Historical Publishing Co.; 1992), pp.2794-2795; San Antonio Central Library; seen 12 Aug 1996

12. Wyoming County Historical Society (WCHS), QUICK folder, loose sheets: Florence K. Wood, 16 Broadview St., Newington, CT 06111; 15 Jun 1981

47. Rev. Garford Williams, "The Stark Family," extracts from the Wyoming Democrat in the WCHS newsletter

78. "Minisink Valley Reformed Dutch Church Records 1716-1830" by New York Genealogical and Biographical Society; book seen at WCHS, June 1996

Example 2 shows Bracketed citations, Renumbered Citations and Endnotes, and details With Citations [using bracketed citations keeps the details separate from the other text and thus easier to follow]:

William and Martha were married on 19 Jun 1789[1] in Nicholson, Wyoming Co, PA[2, p 47]. They lived with his parents, John QUICK and Elizabeth WOOD[3, p 94], at least between 1789 and 1792[4, Vol. 6 No. 1]. William and Martha lived in Bradford County, PA in Nov 1792[5, Vol. III (N-Z) pp 2794-2795].

1. Wyoming County Historical Society (WCHS), QUICK folder, loose sheets: Florence K. Wood, 16 Broadview St., Newington, CT 06111; 15 Jun 1981

2. Arthur Craig Quick, "A Genealogy of the Quick Family in America, 1625 1942," (South Haven and Palisades Park, Michigan: Arthur C. Quick, 1942), as seen on Microfiche No. G1704 at the State Library of Pennsylvania,1994, and photocopies from the original book.

3. "Minisink Valley Reformed Dutch Church Records 1716-1830" by New York Genealogical and Biographical Society; book seen at WCHS, June 1996

4. Rev. Garford Williams, "The Stark Family," extracts from the Wyoming Democrat in the WCHS newsletter

5. "Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files", 3 Vols., abst. by Virgil D. White (Waynesboro, TN: The National Historical Publishing Co.; 1992); San Antonio Central Library, 1996.


Choose Your Weapon

The Web Browser and Word Processor options let you assign a particular software application to function as the default choice when creating reports.

Web Browser choices will be mostly either Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer, but other HTML-ready programs might be available in the list as well, like Claris Home Page or Adobe PageMill, applications used to create and/or modify web pages. If you know you will be making additional changes to a web page before you publish it, opening it with these programs will save a few steps.

Choosing a word processor works the same way. Popular word-processing applications are listed in the pop-up menu, and if you have any of these on your hard drive, they will be enabled (ready for you to select). You are not limited to the applications listed in the pop-up menu, though. For instance, I have WordPerfect, ClarisWorks, and SimpleText on my hard drive. Since all three show up in the pop-up menu, I just choose one and go on. If, however, I want to use a different application, like Adobe PageMaker, that is not in the list, I can choose Other and find and select PageMaker in the dialog box.